Search

Crochet Part 3 - How To Read A Pattern & A Washcloth Pattern For You To Try!


Welcome to the third installment of Crochet 101! If you missed the first two posts, you can find the introduction here and the post about the supplies you'll need here.


Learning a new skill can be a little intimidating, and my goal with this series is to make things as clear and simple as possible. And remember: if you make mistakes or if your first try at something doesn't turn out exactly as planned, be kind to yourself and try to think of all the things you've learned from your first attempt! Everyone has to start somewhere.

This post will be focusing on how to read a pattern, and how to do the foundation stitches in crochet. I even made a video (at the bottom of the page) to show you how to do the stitches you'll need for both the washcloth pattern and the scarf pattern.

But first, a few hints:

  • When making the foundation chain, use a hook 1 or 2 sizes larger than what you will be using for the rest of the pattern. This helps to make the first row easier and neater.

  • While you are crocheting, make sure to slide each loop you make onto the fattest part of your hook. You'll notice that the hook is smallest right by the actual hook, and you want to make sure to size each loop you make to the fat part.

  • Finish the row you are working on before you take a break. There's nothing worse than forgetting how many stitches you have made and having to start the whole row over.

  • Remember to track your progress. You can keep a notebook handy to write down where you left off, or I like to keep a post-it note on the pattern, and will move it next to or under the last row I stitched so that I don't forget where I left off.

And now let's get onto the stitches we use in crochet and how to read a pattern!

Crochet patterns are often written in abbreviations rather than a chart. This is actually easier for me, so I hope it will be easier for you too.

Below is the list of abbreviations we will be using, along with written descriptions of each one. As you are learning the stitches, you can reference this video to put it all into context:


YO - Yarn Over

Wrap the yarn over your crochet hook.

CH - Chain

Wrap the yarn that's still attached to the ball of yarn around the hook (YO), and draw the yarn through the link on the hook, letting the first loop drop off the hook. Repeat until you reach the desired number of stitches. This will be used in two places of your pattern:

  • To start your foundation chain, make a slip knot in the end of your yarn, leaving about 4 inches of a "tail" dangling. Insert hook through the slip knot.

  • Each row will begin with a chain before you start working on your stitches. This makes the edge even.

ST - Stitches

This usually shows up at the end of a row of instructions, telling you how many stitches you have just made. This is useful to count your stitches to make sure you are making the pattern correctly. I usually count as I go along - So, if I see that a row has 20 ST, I will count each one as I make it to ensure that I have made the correct amount of stitches in the row.

SC - Single Crochet

Insert the hook into second chain stitch or the last completed stitch from the hook, YO and draw yarn through it.

SL ST - Slip Stitch

Insert the hook into the next stitch, YO and draw the yarn through both the stitch and the link on the hook in one movement. (I forgot to include this in my video, so you can see a video here.)

HDC - Half Double Crochet

YO your hook then insert the hook into the next stitch on your work. YO your hook and pull the yarn through the stitch. YO again and pull the yarn through all of the loops on your hook in one movement.

DC - Double Crochet

YO your hook then insert the hook into the next stitch on your work. YO your hook and pull the yarn through the stitch. YO again and pull the yarn through only the first two loops on your hook. YO again and pull the yarn through the last two loops on your hook.

Turn

Turn your work around to the other side to start working the next row.

Weave in ends

This finishes the project and secures the ends so that nothing unravels as you use it. Thread the end of the yarn that is attached to your finished project through the tapestry needle. Run the needle through a couple of stitches, change directions and run it vertically, then weave it in the opposite direction.


Weaving in the ends

Now that you've learned the different stitches we will be using, here's the washcloth pattern for you to put your knowledge to work!

-----------------------------------------------------

Easy Crochet Washcloth

Chain 21.

Row 1: Working into the back bumps of the chain, SC into the 2nd chain from the hook and SC into

each CH across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 2: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 3: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 4: CH 2, HDC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 5: CH 1, SC into the first HDC and each HDC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 6: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 7: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 8: CH 2, DC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 9: CH 1, SC into the first DC and each DC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 10: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 11: CH 2, DC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 12: CH 1, SC into the first DC and each DC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 13: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 14: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 15: CH 2, HDC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST.

Row 16: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 17: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

Row 18: CH 1, SC into the first SC and each SC across. Turn. (20 ST)

You can either stop here and weave in the ends using your tapestry needle (this finished washcloth is the green one pictured below), or you can put a finished edge around the whole thing (this finished washcloth is the yellow, blue and green multicolored one).

Edging: CH 1, work SC stitches evenly placed along each side of the washcloth (meaning you should have around 20 ST on the top and bottom edges and around 18 ST on the side edges). When you get to an edge, work 3 SC stitches into the corner before continuing on the next edge.

-----------------------------------------------------


Finished washcloths!

I'll be back soon with the scarf pattern! It is an easy, unisex pattern but I definitely suggest you practice your crochet stitches with the washcloth patterns first before jumping into a scarf. Oh, and I can't wait to see what your washcloths look like, so don't forget to post photos or questions in the forum!

#crochet #crochet101 #learntocrochet #fundamentals #handicrafts #fiberarts #howto #video #washcloth

Learn more about The Modern Domestique

New to the site? Start here.

  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey YouTube Icon
  • Grey Pinterest Icon

© 2014 - 2020 The Modern Domestique. All rights Reserved.